a bloody mess
roadkill problem

Have you ever given much thought to the gruesome deaths taking place on our roads every day? Yes, we are killing fellow humans but we are also killing wildlife in huge numbers. Think of the terrible way these animals die, the awful cost of human injury, the staggering cost of damage to vehicles.

Yes, this website is gruesome. Not pretty to look at. BUT, there is a purpose. It is my firm hope that SOMEbody much smarter than I am will come up with new, better ways to reduce the slaughter. Some methods have already been developed, some are being tried out but there must be other methods not yet dreamed up.


Here are a few pictures to emphasize the necessity to give serious thought to the awful slaughter: (don't click on the titles; simply roll your mouse cursor over them)

roadkill problem
Coyote pup
Cat
Doe
Another Doe
Large Hawk
Baby Moose
Moose
Muskrat
Porcupine
Buck muledeer
Black Dog
Brown bear
Cow elk
Beaver
Car
Red Fox
Fatally injured buck (bone sticking out)
roadkill

All of the above pictures were taken by myself.

Have you "upchucked" into your keyboard yet?

I salute all those who have spent time, energy and money to come up with solutions to reduce this awful kill. Maybe YOU will be the one to come up with even a better solution?

A report in 2003 by Transport Canada stated that beyond the human cost, property damage from animal-vehicle crashes costs $200,000,000 per year.


Parks Canada is testing a system of infrared sensors in Kootenay National Park. In what is believed to be the first project of its kind in the world, two infrared cameras are now set up along the Kootenay National Park Highway near the Dolly Varden picnic site. The cameras, mounted on portable trailers are able to identify the heat signature of any object in view along the three-kilometre stretch of road. The cameras can differentiate between wildlife and oncoming vehicles so when animals are detected, lights and signs located every 500 metres along the roadside will light up to warn traffic to slow down to about 60 km/h. Hopefully this will help reduce the wildlife slaughter. Last year, 49 animals were killed on this highway, including whitetail deer, elk, moose, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, black bears, wolves and coyotes. The wildlife detection system pilot is a cooperative effort between ICBC, Parks Canada, BCCF, CBFWCP, QUIPTECH, and BC MoTH.

If you want more information, click HERE to email the park.

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roadkill solutions roadkill solutions

As for these posts with the red reflectors, I wonder if they work.

We all know that early mornings and evenings are the most dangerous times on our roads; most of these animals are nocturnal and they sleep a good part of the day, coming out to feed in evenings. Further, it is no secret that the autumn is dangerous because the "rut" (breeding season) causes the animals to be "on the move." Likewise, spring is dangerous due to females moving their newborn young around to keep them safe.

Electronic signs are being used and I hope to get pictures later.


roadkill links

http://www.road-kill-cafe.com/ This one makes fun of roadkill so I almost omitted it.

http://www.hackpilot.com/roadkill/ likewise with this one; thanks, Tom; nicely done.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/ab/banff/docs/routes/chap3/sec3/routes3c_e.asp lists some stats re Banff National Park

http://www.deercrash.com/ has some excellent information and stunning statistics

In July of 2011, the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador announced a $5 Million program aiming to curb moose-vehicle collisions. I applaud them! Government statistics released several years ago estimated about 700 moose-vehicle collisions each year.

If I might make a confession, I got the idea of this website not only from all the roadkill I see along the highways, but also from the logo used by Irfanview, the BEST freeware graphics software on the www. You'll see the logo and be able to download the program at http://irfanview.tuwien.ac.at/ THANKS to Irfan Skiljan!



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